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Campfire Toffee Apples

Collage of making campfire toffee apples

When choosing a campsite, we try to find ones that allow fires. While marshmallows are the usual campfire treat, campfire toffee apples are far more engaging.

Note: This activity does need adult supervision, but it is a great way to teach about fire safety and how to use a pocket knife. Also, if it is not clear whether fires are permitted at a campsite check with the local regional council or ranger. Total fire bans are often in place during the height of summer. Use this NZ Fire Service site to check.It was mentioned by a reader that in some countries branches may be poisonous, please check what is suitable in your country.

First, the stick hunt. Only branches that are on the ground, sturdy enough to hold the apples and long enough to keep little hands away from the flames.

First is the stick hunt, only use sticks that found are on the ground, please do not damage trees, this is also an offense in some areas. Soak sticks in water if they are very dry.

Sharpen one end of each stick to a point. Older kids love this job, but it can be a good time to supervise and to teach youngsters how to safely handle small sharp knives.

Peel your apples, if not using immediately store in a bowl of water with a dash of either lemon juice or vinegar to stop them going brown.

Poke the sticks into the core of your peeled apples, we used Braeburn and Granny Smith apples, but any favorite variety of apple will do, depending on your campsite and time of year you may even be able to forage for them.

Cover a plate in sugar with some cinnamon ready to roll the apples in.

Warm the apples over your small fire. Once warm, roll the apples in the sugar mix and sprinkle the mixture over any gaps.

Hold the campfire toffee apples over the fire, keep the stick turning until it is dark caramel colour all over. The depth of colour really does depend on how patient the child is.

IMPORTANT: Melted sugar can cause nasty burns. The apple needs a couple of minutes to cool before eating. Alternatively, dipping in the water/river is a quick way to cool them.

 

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Tent site with campfire on the riverbank at Kaitoke Regional Park

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